Positive Thinking Is Never A Substitute For Positive Action

It pays to be positive, but you still need to move.

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For most of my life, one of the defining traits for me is that I’m positive. In most situations, I have a smile on my face and I have an overly optimistic view of the world and when facing problems.

Obviously, those views and opinions seep into my writing and I feel that now would be an appropriate time to set a few records straight about positivity and my own views on it.

Over time, I’ve come to realize that positivity has a pretty negative underbelly to it. Behind optimistic views and flowery words, positivity can be seen as a tool for manipulation, stasis, or can be outright cruel.

Be positive” these days is the equivalent of saying “cheer up” to someone who is depressed. And we know now that depression is a deeper psychological state than sadness or negativity.

I’ve gone on record before to say that my version of the law of attraction is different as well. The traditional one suggests that “like attracts like” but that’s not always the case.

And positivity can be so manipulative that we may be escaping our own problems.

But as I said, the way that I think now and have been explaining myself over the years is that I am a positive thinker — with a touch of realism.

I understand that some people see my positive demeanour and immediately think I’m some poor sap of a “life coach” who spouts nothing but “be positive” and that the law of attraction will set you free.

No.

I realize that one must be critical, and focused and have a deep understanding of what drives them in order to succeed. It’s seriously tough work.

Not to mention that positive thinking alone isn’t going to put a stop to natural occurrences out of our control. Positive thinking never stopped any wars that we’ve had or the series of financial crashes and natural disasters that have shaken the world over.

But that’s not a reason to give up entirely on positive thinking.

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Eric S Burdon

Entrepreneur, positive-minded. I used to say a lot, but now I do a lot.